Custom Style

Sewing that's Retro, Geek, and Chic

Tag Archives: skirt

Happy Towel Day!

And Happy Geek Pride Day!

Today I’m spending the afternoon working at the little local fabric store and wearing my newly made Star Trek comic print skirt.

Star-Trek-TOS-Print-Skirt

I didn’t use a pattern for my skirt. It’s just a basic petticoat-style skirt with an elastic waistband, which I made with rectangles of fabric. (More details in a minute.)

Star-Trek-TOS-Print-Skirt-Back

I still have plans to remake a better fitting knit Dandelion top a la TOS style, but I haven’t gotten to that point in my sewing queue.

So I’m just wearing an old store-bought polo I’ve had in my closet for years with my new skirt. The polo’s a bit too long for the skirt, but it’ll do for now.

Elastic-Waist-Gathered-Skirt

I’ve had this fabric for months knowing I wanted a geeky skirt out of it. I was even able to print-match across the seams without losing too many inches!

Print-Matching

What seam? =)

Here’s a simplified how-to diagram to explain making the elastic-waistband skirt (detailed instructions following):

Sketch-How-to-Make-Simple-Skirt

Mine finished about 19½-inches long (knee-length worn a couple inches below waist) using the following measurements & steps:

  • Cut one 6½-inch tall strip for yoke and three 17-inch tall strips all the width of fabric (mine was 44 inches wide).
  • Sew shorter yoke strip together for center back seam, creating a loop with the fabric.
  • Sew three longer strips together end-to-end (match print if desired and able), creating a loop about 3-times the diameter of the yoke.
  • Hem longer loop with a double-fold – ⅜-inch fold then another ⅜-inch.
  • Fold top of yoke down ¼-inch then another 1¾-inch for 1½ -inch elastic casing. Stitch down leaving opening at center back for elastic.
  • Mark the four quarter points of each loop of fabric on unfinished edges (top of larger and bottom of smaller yoke loop).
  • Gather larger loop and attach to yoke bottom edge with ½-inch seam allowance, matching 4 previously marked points.
  • Insert elastic cut at comfortable length to fit just below waist. Overlap and stitch ends of elastic and stitch casing closed. Evenly distribute fullness around waistband.
  • Stitch in the ditch through elastic at center back and through the elastic in 2 or 3 other places on the waistband to hold it in place.

Here are a couple of sewing tricks I like to use:

Hem-Pressing

Machine stitch a guideline for pressing up an even hem.

Elastic-Waistband-Casing

Edge-stitch right at the outer fold of elastic casing to help keep elastic from rolling in casing.

This skirt works really well with a petticoat underneath so I pulled out my ‘50s style petticoat (it’s an XL kid’s size so it’s shorter than the period appropriate length).

TOS-Skirt-with-Petticoat

My husband hates the petticoat look but I love it!

Without&With-Petticoat

Without petticoat (L) and with petticoat (R).

Fluffy…

girly…

fun!

It required spinning.

Spinning

We will see how many fabric store customers notice my geekiness at work today or even know what today is. By the way, I always keep a towel in my car – but my dog gets more use out of it than I do.

Speaking of the dog, you might be wondering “where’s Wensley?” because he usually likes to photo bomb. Believe me, he tried but there was a door in his way this time:

Wheres-Wensley

And I leave you with this silly picture, because I still like the skirt best with the petticoat underneath:

Silly

One to beam out. So long, and thanks for all the fish!

Advertisements

Stars and Stripes

Happy Fourth of July!

This past Sunday my church celebrated Independence Day with an outdoor picnic after the service. We are encouraged to dress casually & patriotically for this annual event, but (call me old-fashioned) I just can’t bring myself to wear shorts & a t-shirt to worship! (Had it not been an outdoor event in the Texas heat, I probably would have worn my ’40s dress with a red headband instead of hat.)

I did, however, dress less formally than my usual church attire – I wore a casual skirt I made myself for a 4th of July party a few years ago.

My casual patriotic skirt.

I made this skirt out of scraps of denim I had left from a client’s project and a yard of patriotic stripes I bought because it wasn’t so stereotypical “stars and stripes”. I had to piece the denim before I cut the pattern out, but luckily, it is a dark enough navy that the piecing is hard to notice from the outside.

You can see some of my crazy piecing on the inside because I serged everything in ivory thread.

I used a store-bought Vogue pattern – number 8296 (it’s now out-of-print). I always liked the lines of the pattern for view A but I can’t stand raw edges on my clothes. So I did some fun point sewing, and by using two different fabrics, the style lines really stand out.

Pattern & completed skirt.
Sewing tip: when choosing a pattern, look at the style lines of the garment sketch instead of the envelope art – it will keep you from being influenced by the colors and fabric choices of the designer.

I like how the pattern’s asymmetrical seams sort of look like points on a star and how the stripes end up going in all different directions.

Side and Back view of skirt. It is nice how the slight breeze is catching the flounce so you kind of can see how the skirt moves.

I tried to make myself a patriotic outfit that wasn’t too cliché (I get bored with the garments that look like you’re wearing a flag) and I think it ended up being a fun skirt.

Wensley wanted in on the action but he wanted to get too close to the camera, so I’m having to hold him back, hehe.

I hope all of you in the U.S. have a wonderful Fourth!

%d bloggers like this: